Elite personal development for young people

Youth Performing Arts

The performing arts offer an invaluable array of life skills and learning outcomes for young people including: confidence, enhanced verbal/written communication, self analysis and independence, public speaking and presentation skills, negotiation and handling rejection, building relationships and empathy, dealing with confrontation and conflict, offers opportunity for giving and receiving positive feedback as well as being a great way to make new friends and a forum for fun & laughter

Testimonials

"I thought the drama lessons were really useful because they taught me things I hadn't actually done at school or at previous drama things, even 5 years ago, I learnt stuff now that I didn't know then and it kind of helped me, it made me step more out of my comfort zone" - Karl, 16


"As the parent it was nice to know the techniques that the children had started to learn about, the performance was excellent" - Sonia, parent


“It was very good, it got people out of their comfort zone, it made Kelly come out a lot more cause it involved us doing silly things…freedom, dynamic, exciting, and it was easy to do, you don’t have to be a professional... everybody give Scarlet a big round of applause, say Scarlet we love you”  

- Harry, Observing Drama Teacher 


“I thought it was going to be embarrassing but it wasn’t it was good”  - Riley, aged 12


Drama Workshops

Drama is an important part of stimulating creativity and problem solving. It challenges students perceptions about themselves and the world around them. It’s a safe outlet for emotions and exploration as students become authors, often re-writing events through role play, once the event is played out in front of them, they have a better idea of the paths they should or should not choose in life. 


Singing Workshops


“Singing has psychological benefits because of its normally positive effect in reducing stress levels through the action of the endocrine system which is linked to our sense of emotional well-being. Psychological benefits are also evident when people sing together as well as alone because of the increased sense of community, belonging and shared endeavour.” - Professor Graham Welch (Chair of Music Education at the Institute of Education at the University of London)


Young people reported that their engagement with the performing arts also impacted on a wide range of outcomes such as relieving stress, calming down, dealing with criticism and managing their own emotions

Centre for Public Health Research, 2006